Making Challenge

Based on the sketches provided by Jacob and the Saffron team, the experts from La Navarra drew up the technical drawings and defined the different sections into which Limiting factor would be divided.

© Uxío Da Vila / AHEC
© Uxío Da Vila / AHEC

“This is a really special piece, made up of a series of fans which fold to create a shell”, explained Miguel Angel from La Navarra. And in relation to the type of wood chosen, he added “tulipwood is a really easy wood to work on, it doesn´t twist or warp and doesn´t have knots.”

Another of the advantages of using tulipwood is the lightweight nature of this species, as despite the fact that Limiting Factor is a voluminous piece, it weighs relatively little, which makes it easier to transport.

© Uxío Da Vila / AHEC

“This is a really special piece, made up of a series of fans which fold to create a shell.”

© Uxío Da Vila / AHEC
© Uxío Da Vila / AHEC

The American tulipwood chosen for this piece has a marble look quality, with a color ranging from cream to olive green. As time passes, the cabin will change its appearance and its color will vary, becoming grayer. The changes resulting from the prolonged exposure to light and other external factors will eventually fulfill Jacob’s idea of ​​creating a refuge that “merges with nature.”